Members

 

“What we are proposing is to use this moment as a unique opportunity to come together as “a finite community of researchers” for an equally finite period of time, to construct the collective analysis of the concept of biopower that is dispersed throughout our own individual research and writing projects.” — Gregg Lambert, co-convenor


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Co-Conveners:

GREGG LAMBERT is Dean's Professor of Humanities and Founding Director of the Syracuse University Humanities Center (2008 – 2014); Principal Investigator of the Central New York Humanities Corridor.

Selected Publications:

Philosophy After Friendship. University of Minnesota Press, forthcoming 2016.

Return Statements: Return of Religion in Contemporary Philosophy. "Incitements," eds. Dimitris Vardoulakis and Peg Birmingham. Edinburgh University Press, 2016.

In Search of a New Image of Thought: Gilles Deleuze and Philosophical Expressionism. University of Minnesota Press, 2012.

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CARY WOLFE is the Bruce and Elizabeth Dunlevie Professor of English, and founding Director of 3CT: Center for Critical and Cultural Theory at Rice University. He publishes widely in areas such as animal studies and posthumanism, systems theory and pragmatism, biopolitics and biophilosophy, and American literature and culture, and he has written numerous pieces on art, music, architecture, and other kinds of non-literary culture.

Selected Publications:

Before the Law: Humans and Other Animals in a Biopolitical Frame. University of Chicago Press, 2013

What Is Posthumanism? Posthumanities. University of Minnesota Press, 2010.

Animal Rites: American Culture, the Discourse of Species, and Posthumanist Theory. University of Chicago Press, 2003.

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Original Members:

RICHARD BARNEY is an Associate Professor of English at the University at Albany, State University of New York. Professor Barney researches and publishes in the areas of 18th-century British studies, critical and cultural theory, gender studies, and film.

Selected Publications:

Plots of Enlightenment: Education and the Novel in Eighteenth-Century England. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1999.

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FRIDA BECKMAN is a Researcher in the Department of English at Stockholm University. She was previously a Post Doctoral Research in the Department of Thematic Studies, Linköping, University of Sweden, a researcher and teacher at Uppsala University as well as a visiting lecturer at Stockholm University, Sweden. She holds a PhD in American Literature from Uppsala University.

Selected Publications:

Between Desire and Pleasure: A Deleuzian Theory of Sexuality. Plateaus - New Directions in Deleuze Studies. Edinburgh University Press, 2013.

Editor. Deleuze and Sex. Deleuze Connections. Edinburgh University Press, 2011.

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TIMOTHY CAMPBELL is a Professor of Italian in the Department of Romance Studies at Cornell University. He is the winner of the 2007 Media Ecology Association's Lewis Mumford Award for Outstanding Scholarship in the Ecology of Technics for his book, Writing in the Age of Marconi (University of Minnesota Press, 2006).

His current projects include a study of biopolitics and post-colonialism and an examination of Italian political cinema and contemporary thought. At Cornell he teaches courses on contemporary Italian philosophy, Italian cinema, and core courses in the Italian major.

Selected Publications:

Esposito, Roberto. Communitas: The Origin and Destiny of Community. Translated by Timothy Campbell. Cultural Memory in the Present. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2010.

Esposito, Roberto. Bíos: Biopolitics and Philosophy. Translated by Timothy Campbell. Posthumanities. University of Minnesota Press, 2008.

Wireless Writing in the Age of Marconi. Electronic Mediations. University of Minnesota Press, 2006.

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PETER CANNING is a Lacanian analyst working privately and in cartels (topological-analytic work-groups) and public seminars in New York City. He teaches psychoanalysis at Pratt Institute and has taught comparative literature at the University of California (Berkeley) and University of Minnesota.

Selected Publications:

"Whitehead’s Involution of an Outside Chance (‘That What Cannot Be – Yet Is’)." In The Lure of Whitehead, edited by Nicholas Gaskill and Adam Nocek. University of Minnesota, 2014.

"Klossowski’s Alternative." Diacritics 35, no. 1 (2005): 99-118.

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PATRICIA CLOUGH is a professor of Sociology and Women’s Studies at the Graduate Center and Queens College of the City University of New York.

Selected Publications:

"The Digital, Labor and Measure Beyond Biopolitics." In Digital Labor: The Internet as Playground and Factory, edited by Trebor Scholz, 112-26. Routledge, 2012.

"War By Other Means: What Difference Do(es) the Graphic(s) Make?" Edited by Athina Karatzogianni. In Digital Cultures and the Politics of Emotion: Feelings, Affect and Technological Change, edited by Adi Kuntsman, 21-32. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.

Autoaffection: Unconscious Thought in the Age of Teletechnology. University of Minnesota Press, 2000.

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CLAIRE COLEBROOK is the Edwin Erle Sparks Professor of English at Pennsylvania State University. She has written articles on visual culture, poetry, literary theory, queer theory and contemporary culture. She is completing a book on human extinction.

Selected Publications:

Blake, Deleuzian Aesthetics and the Digital. Continuum Literary Studies. Bloomsbury Academic, 2012.

Deleuze and the Meaning of Life. Continuum Literary Studies. Bloomsbury Academic, 2010.

Milton, Evil and Literary History. Continuum Literary Studies. Bloomsbury Academic, 2008.

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RICHARD DOYLE earned his Ph.D. in Rhetoric at UC Berkeley. He was the Mellon Post Doctoral Fellow in History and Social Science of the Life Sciences at MIT in 1993. Professor of Rhetoric, Doyle holds appointments in English, Science Technology & Society and the College of Information Science and Technology at Pennsylvania State University Doyle teaches courses in the history and rhetoric of emerging technosciences - sustainability, space colonization, biotechnology, nanotechnology, psychedelic science, information technologies, biometrics - and the cultural and literary contexts from which they sprout.

Selected Publications:

Wetwares: Experiments in Postvital Living. Theory Out of Bounds. University of Minnesota Press, 2003.

On beyond Living: Rhetorical Transformations of the Life Sciences. Writing Science. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1997.

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BRAD EVANS is a Senior Lecturer in International Relations at Bristol University (UK). He is also the Founder and Director of the Histories of Violence project. His co-directed film (with Simon Critchley) “Ten Years of Terror” received international acclaim, screening in numerous cultural venues including the Guggenheim in New York (September 2011). He is a listed contributor for the Guardian Newspaper's Comment is Free and a consultant on violence to a number of cultural organizations. Brad sits on a number of editorial boards for reputable international journals. In addition, he is a serving board member for the Centre for Education in the Public Interest (McMaster University, Ontario); and honorary associate of the Zygmunt Bauman Institute (The University of Leeds). 

Selected Publications:

Liberal Terror. Polity, 2013.

With Julian Reid. Resilient Life: The Art of Living Dangerously. Polity, 2014.

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GREGORY FLAXMAN is an Associate Professor of English at the University of South Carolina, Chapel Hill. He is the recipient numerous grants, awards, and fellowships, including the 2012-2013 Australian Research Council Grant for Film/Philosophy.

Selected Publications:

Gilles Deleuze and the Fabulation of Philosophy: Powers of the False, Volume 1. Gilles Deleuze and the Fabulation of Philosophy. University of Minnesota Press, 2011.

Editor. The Brain Is the Screen: Deleuze and the Philosophy of Cinema. University of Minnesota Press, 2000.

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IRVING GOH received his Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from Cornell University, after which he served as Research Fellow and Visiting Scholar at Cornell's Society for the Humanities. He is currently Mellon Postdoc Fellow at the Center for the Humanities and the Department of Romance (French) at Tufts University.

Selected Publications:

The Reject: Community, Politics, and Religion after the Subject. New York: Fordham University Press, 2014.

"Sovereignty without Subject." In Nancy Now, eds. Verena Andermatt Conley and Irving Goh. Cambridge: Polity, 2014. Pp. 152-170.

"Becoming-Animal: Transversal Politics." diacritics 39 (2): 37-57, published 2012.

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MEERA LEE is an Assistant Professor of Asian American Studies; Affiliated Faculty in Asian/Asian American Studies at Syracuse University. Dr. Lee first came to Syracuse University as a Visiting Research Fellow on the Korean government postdoctoral fellowship after obtaining her Ph.D. in English with comparative studies on Korean literature and culture from Dankook University, Seoul.

Selected Publications:

The Malady of Han: Trauma, Phantom and Korean Subjectivity. In progress.

『누가  헤밍웨이  남성을  두려워  하는가?』 (Who's Afraid of Hemingway Men?). Dongin, 2006.

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TIMOTHY MURRAY is a Professor of Comparative Literature and English, and is Director of the Society for the Humanities, Curator of the Rose Goldsen Archive of New Media Art at Cornell University.

His research and teaching crosses the boundaries of new media, film and video, visual studies, twentieth-century Continental philosophy, psychoanalysis, critical theory, performance, and English and French early modern studies.

Selected Publications:

"De-Commodification of Artworks: Networked Fantasy of the Open." In The Emergence of Video Processing Tools: Television Becoming Unglued, edited by Kathryn High, Sherry Miller Hocking, and Mona Jimenez. Intellect, 2014.

Digital Baroque: New Media Art and Cinematic Folds. Electronic Mediations. University of Minnesota Press, 2008.

Drama Trauma: Specters of Race and Sexuality in Performance, Video, and Art. Routledge, 1997.

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JEFFREY T. NEALON is a Liberal Arts Research Professor of English and Philosophy at Pennsylvania State University, specializing in American literature after 1900, theory and cultural studies, and visual culture (film, contemporary visual culture, visual culture theory).

Selected Publications:

Post-postmodernism, Or, The Cultural Logic of Just-in-time Capitalism. Stanford University Press, 2012.

Co-editor with Susan Searls. Giroux. The Theory Toolbox: Critical Concepts for the New Humanities. Culture and Politics Series. Rowman & Littlefield, 2003.

Alterity Politics: Ethics and Performative Subjectivity. Duke University Press, 1998.

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ADAM NOCEK is an Assistant Professor in the Philosophy of Technology and Science and Technology Studies in the School of Arts, Media + Engineering at Arizona State University. Nocek works at the intersections of Continental philosophy and science studies, digital culture and aesthetics, and design theory and technoscience, and has published numerous essays on media theory, artificial life, architecture, the history of biotechnology, and process philosophy. He is the co-editor of the collection The Lure of Whitehead (Minnesota 2014), and a special issue of the journal Inflexions titled “Animating Biophilosophy” (2014). He is currently working on a manuscript titled Haunting Science: Animism, Commodification, and Life's Ghostly Image. Nocek is also Director of the Laboratory for Critical Technics (LCT) in Tempe, Arizona. 

Selected Publications:

Co-editor with Phillip Thurtle “Animating Biophilosophy.” Inflexions 7 (2013).

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JACKIE ORR is an Associate Professor of Sociology in the Maxwell School of Syracuse University. Professor Orr specialized in contemporary and feminist theory; critical studies of technology, science and psychiatry, and cultural politics.

Selected Publications:

"Biopsychiatry and the Informatics of Diagnosis." In Biomedicalization: Technoscience, Health, and Illness in the U.S., edited by Adele Clarke, Laura Mamo, Jennifer R. Fosket, Jennifer R. Fishman, and Janet K. Shim, 353-79. Duke University Press, 2010

Panic Diaries: A Genealogy of Panic Disorder. Duke University Press, 2006.

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PAUL PATTON is a Professor in the School of History & Philosophy at the University of New South Wales, Australia. His research interests include modern European philosophy since Kant, especially Nietzsche and late 20th Century French philosophy: Deleuze, Derrida and Foucault; political philosophy, especially political liberalism and the rights of colonized indigenous peoples.

Selected Publications:

Deleuzian Concepts: Philosophy, Colonization, Politics. Cultural Memory in the Present. Stanford University Press, 2010.

Co-editor with Simone Bignall. Deleuze and the Postcolonial. Deleuze Connections. Edinburgh University Press, 2010.

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KALPANA SESHADRI Kalpana Seshadri is a Professor of English at Boston College. Professor Seshadri specializes in Postcolonial Studies with an emphasis in historical theories of imperialism and globalization. She teaches courses pertaining to British colonialism, colonial literature and non-western literatures in English. Her research field is the Philosophy of Race, focusing on questions of subjectivity, ethics, language and law.

Selected Publications:

HumAnimal: Race, Law, Language. Posthumanities. University of Minnesota Press, 2012.

Desiring Whiteness: A Lacanian Analysis of Race. Opening Out: Feminism for Today. Routledge, 2000.

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GREG THOMAS is an Associate Professor of English at Tufts University. He obtained a PhD from the Rhetoric Department at UC Berkeley and an MA from the “Philosophy, Interpretation & Culture” Program at SUNY-Binghamton. He is founder and editor of PROUD FLESH, an e-journal published by African Resource Center.

Selected Publications:

Co-editor with Dr. LaMonda H. Stallings. Word Hustle: Critical Essays and Reflections on the Works of Donald Goines. Black Classic Press, Inprint Editions, 2011

Hip-Hop Revolution in the Flesh: Power, Knowledge & Pleasure in Lil' Kim's Lyricism. Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.

The Sexual Demon of Colonial Power: Pan-African Embodiment and Erotic Schemes of Empire. Blacks in the Diaspora. Indiana University Press, 2007.

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DAVID WILLS, Professor of French at Brown University, Doctorat du Troisième Cycle, Université de Paris III. His major ideas are developed in Prosthesis (Stanford, 1995), and subsequently in Dorsality (Minnesota, 2008), where he argues that the animal, or specifically human body should be understood as a prosthetic articulation of "natural" and "artificial"; and that our conception of the human as intact natural entity that subsequently comes into contact with inanimate forms of technology does not account for the prosthetic relations that govern the ways we in fact operate in the world.

Selected Publications:

Dorsality: Thinking Back Through Technology and Politics Dorsality: Thinking Back through Technology and Politics. Posthumanities. University of Minnesota Press, 2008.

Matchbook: Essays in Deconstruction. Meridian: Crossing Aesthetics. Stanford University Press, 2005.

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New Members 2013

SIMONE BIGNALL is Vice Chancellor's Post-Doctoral Research Fellow in Philosophy at the University of New South Wales, Australia. Her primary research interests fall within the field of political philosophy, often informed by her active participation in various communities of practice.

Selected Publications:

Co-editor with Marcelo Svirsky. Agamben and Colonialism. Critical Connections. Edinburgh University Press, 2012.

Postcolonial Agency: Critique and Constructivism. Plateaus – New Directions in Deleuze Studies. Edinburgh University Press, 2010.

Co-editor with Paul Patton. Deleuze and the Postcolonial. Deleuze Connections. Edinburgh University Press, 2010.

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VERA BÜHLMANN is a researcher and lecturer at the Institute for Technology in Architecture, CAAD, ETH Zurich, where she has co-founded the theory-lab for applied virtuality. Her recent work revolvs around a quantum-semiotic perspective on code, and the practices on encryption and deciphering that constitute the computation of symbols as an expanded literacy involving probabilistic alphabets of coding. Her private research blog is www.monasandnomos.org.

Selected Publications:

Die Nachricht, ein Medium. Generische Medialität, Städtische Architektonik (ambra, Vienna 2014).

Domesticating Symbols (ambra, Vienna 2014).

Sheaves–When Things Are Whatever Can Be The Case (ambra, Vienna 2013).

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DEREK R. FORD is a PhD candidate in Cultural Foundations of Education at Syracuse University. His studies are located around pedagogy, political economy, space, and air, and currently focus on conceptualizing 'educational atmospheres.' Recent publications have appeared in Educational Philosophy and Theory, Critical Studies in Education, borderlands e-journal, and Studies in Philosophy and Education.

Selected Publications:

"The Pneumatic Common: Learning in, with and from the Air," Educational Philosophy and Theory, in press.

"Toward a Theory of the Educational Encounter: Gert Biesta's Educational Theory and the Right to the City," Critical Studies in Education, 54(3), 299-310.

"A Critical Pedagogy of Ineffability: Identity, Education and the Secret Life of Whatever," Educational Philosophy and Theory, 46(4), 380-392.

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CRISTINA IULI is Professor in the Department of Humanities at the Università del Piemonte Orientale. Her areas of interest are American literature, especially Modernism and Post-Modernism, cultural studies, literary and critical theory, systems theory, theories of modernity, science and literature.

Selected Publications:

Spell it Modern: Modernity and the Question of Literature. Mercurio, 2009.

Giusto il tempo di esplodere: Miss Lonelyhearts, il romanzo pop di Nathanael West. Sestante, 2005.

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A. KIARINA KORDELA is Professor of German Studies and founding Director of the Critical Theory Program, at Macalester College, St. Paul, Minnesota, & Honorary Adjunct Professor with the School of Humanities and Languages, Writing and Society Research Group, University of Western Sydney, Australia. She received her Ph.D. at Cornell University in 1998. She specializes in philosophy and intellectual history, with an emphasis on the formation of modernity; critical theory; Freudian and Lacanian psychoanalysis; German Baroque and Modernist literature; comparative literature and literary theory; political theory, theories of ideology and cultural analysis; visual and film theory; biopolitics. One distinguishing aspect of both her research and teaching is her focus on the relation between economic structures and metaphysics in secular capitalist modernity.

Selected Publications:

Being, Time, Bios: Capitalism and Ontology. SUNY Series, Insinuations: Philosophy, Psychoanalysis, Literature. State University of New York Press, 2013.

Surplus: Spinoza, Lacan. State University of New York Press, 2007.

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ALEX TAEK-GWANG LEE is an Associate Professor in Kyung Hee University, Republic of Korea. He obtained MA in philosophy from University of Warwick and PhD in Cultural Theory from University of Sheffield. His research interests are philosophy, Asian cinema, Lacanian psychoanalysis, and politics. He is an editorial member of The Journal of English Language and Literature, Theory and Criticism Journal, Literature and Cinema Journal and Gwangju Biennale Journal NOON, in South Korea.

Selected Publications:

Fail Better: Conversations with Zizek, Ranciere, Baumann, Spivak. Jaeum&Moeum (2013)

The Obscene Fantasy of Korean Culture. Jaeum&Moeum (2012)

This Is What Is Called Cultural Criticism. Jaeum&Moeum (2011)

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ADRIAN L. PARR is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and School of Architecture and Interior Design at the University of Cincinnati. Her research interests are social and political philosophy, and cultural criticism.

Selected Publications:

The Wrath of Capital: Neoliberalism and Climate Change Politics. Columbia University Press, 2013.

Hijacking Sustainability. MIT Press, 2009.

Deleuze and Memorial Culture: Desire, Singular Memory and the Politics of Trauma. Edinburgh University Press, 2008.

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KAREN PINKUS is a Professor of Italian and Comparative Literature at Cornell University. She is also a minor graduate field member in Studio Art, a member of the Advisory Board of the Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future and a member of the Climate Change Focus Group. Karen is on the editorial boards of diacritics and World Picture Journal. For diacritics, she edited a special issue on climate change criticism (43.1), thirty years on from the influential issue on nuclear criticism. A forthcoming book titled Fuel thinks about issues crucial to climate change by arguing for a separation of fuel (perhaps understood as potentiality, or dynamis, to use the Aristotelian term) from energy as a system of power (actuality, use). Fuel follows a series of literary, filmic and critical texts through the form of a dictionary (from “air” to “zyklon D”). Fuel engages with literature, art and critical theory as they are central to analogy and in turn, to fuel itself.

Selected Publications:

“Humans and Fuels, Bios and Zoe,” chapter in A Cultural History of Climate Change, eds. Tom Ford and Tom Bristow. Forthcoming, Routledge (environmental humanities series), 2014.

“Thinking Diverse Futures from a Carbon Present,” Symploke vol. 21, nos. 1-2 (special issue on Critical Climate): pp. 200-210, 2013.

“Ambiguity. Ambience, Ambivalence, and the Environment” Common Knowledge 19:1 (December) (Symposium: Fuzzy Studies, Part 4), pp. 88-95, 2012.

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GABRIELE M. SCHWAB is a Chancellor's Professor of Comparative Literature for the School of Humanities; Faculty Associate in the Department of Anthropology; Core faculty in the Program in Theory and Culture; Associate Faculty in Women's Studies; 0% appointment in the departments of English and German for the School of Humanities; PH.D., University of Konstanz; Habilitation, University of Kostanz; Ph.D., New Center for Psychoanalysis, Los Angeles, 2009, Psychoanalysis.

Selected Publications:

Clones, Fakes and Posthumans: Cultures of Replication, co-edited with Philomena Essed (Rodopi UP, 2012).

Imaginary Ethnographies: Literature, Culture, Subjectivity, (NY: Columbia UP, 2012).

Literature, Power, and Subjectivity, translated into Chinese by Tao Jiajun, General Editor, Wang Fengzhen, Beijing: CASS Publishing House, Series: Intellectual History, January 2011.

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ALAN STOEKL is a Professor of French and Comparative Literature at Penn State. He specializes in literary theory, translation, and twentieth century European literature. 

Selected Publications:

Agonies of the Intellectual; and Politics, Writing, Mutilation: The Cases of Bataille, Blanchot, Roussel, Leiris and Ponge. University of Nebraska Press, 1992).

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ANTOINE TRAISNEL is an Assistant Professor of Literary and Cultural Theory in the Department of Comparative Literature at Cornell University. He holds a Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from Brown University. He also holds a doctorate in American Literature from the Université Charles-de-Gaulle, Lille 3. He has published on topics in the fields of American, French and German literature and philosophy, critical theory, cultural studies, and animal studies in such forums as Diacritics, Humanimalia, Presses Universitaires de l’Ecole Normale Supérieure, Sites and Théorie Littérature Epistémologie.

Selected Publications:

Blasted Allegories: après-coups de Nathaniel Hawthorne. Contracted by Aux Forges de Vulcain press (French, Forthcoming, spring 2015).

“Capitalisme et capture : actualités d’un concept chez Deleuze et Guattari et Agamben,” Théorie, Littérature, Enseignement (Forthcoming, November 2014).

“Huntology: Ontological Pursuits and Still Lives,” Diacritics, Johns Hopkins University Press (Summer 2012).

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DIMITRIS VARDOULAKIS is chair of Philosophy at the University of Western Sydney. His research interests include the relation between literature and philosophy, as well as theories of power and sovereignty.

Selected Publications:

Sovereignty and Its Other: Toward the Dejustification of Violence. Fordham University Press, 2013.

The Doppelgänger: Literature's Philosophy. Fordham University Press, 2010.

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MIGUEL VATTER is a Professor of Political Science at the University of New South Wales, Australia. His current areas of research and publication are Machiavelli, Kant, republicanism, biopolitics, and political theology. His most recent research project was on "Rawls and Republicanism," and he is currently doing research on the theme of "Political Representation and Political Theology". He is co-founder and director of a biopolitics research network, www.biopolitica.org.

Selected Publications:

The Republic of the Living: Biopolitics and the Critique of Civil Society. Commonalities. Fordham University Press, 2014.

Co-editor with Vanessa Lemm. The Government of Life: Foucault, Biopolitics, and Neoliberalism. Forms of Living. Fordham University Press, 2014.

Machiavelli's the Prince: A Reader's Guide. Bloomsbury Academic, 2013.

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MARIA WHITEMAN was an Assistant Professor of Drawing and Intermedia in Fine Arts at the University of Alberta. She taught graduate courses in contemporary art theory and studio courses in mixed media, photography, video, drawing and installation art. Her current art practice explores themes such as art and science, relationships between industry, community and nature, and the place of animals in our cultural and social imaginary. In addition to her studio work, she conducts research in contemporary art theory and visual culture. Maria has published critical texts in Public: Art/Culture/Ideas, Minnesota Review and Antennae and an essay on Visual Culture in the John Hopkins Guide to Literary Theory and Criticism. In 2011, Whiteman was the recipient of an Interdisciplinary Course Seminar Grant from the Kule Institute for Advanced Studies was a scholar in the Canadian Institute for Research Computing in the Arts. In 2011, she had a solo exhibition at Latitude 53. Exhibited in the Alberta Biennial at the Art Gallery of Alberta 2013. Whiteman was a co-director of the 2012 (BRIC) Banff Research in Culture/ documenta 13 research residency and participated in the Geoffrey Famer Residency at the Banff Centre in 2012. She has been presenting conference papers and exhibiting artworks at the SLSA 2012-2015. Whiteman's “Mountain Pine Beetle and Roadside Kestrel” most recent video/photography work will be premiered at the Houston Cinema Arts Festival and Rice Media Centre, Houston, TX, Nov 2014.

Selected Publications:

“Oil Imag(e)inaries: Critical Realism and the Oil Sands” (co-written with Imre Szeman). Imaginations: Journal of Cross-Cultural Image Studies 3.2 (2012): 46-67. Oil Imag(e)inaries [1.26MB]

The Retreat (edited with Imre Szeman and Heather Zwicker). Special issue of Public: Art / Culture / Ideas 50 (2014), Nov, 2014

“Im(mobility).” Photo-essay co-author Cary Wolfe, for Global Animal, special issue of English Studies in Canada, edited by Karen Ball and Melissa Haynes, in preparation (forthcoming) Sublime Animal” Liza Piper and Lisa Szabo, eds., Sustaining the West: Cultural Responses to Western Environments, Past and Present. Waterloo: WLUP, FALL, 2013

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New Members 2015

LYNN BADIA is a Banting Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Alberta and Visiting Scholar the University of Cambridge for the Fall 2015 term, as part of the Climate Histories Research Group at CRASSH Cambridge. She holds a Ph.D. in English from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, as well as graduate certificates from Duke University in the History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, & Medicine, and from UNC-Chapel Hill in Cultural Studies. Her research is focused on questions about scientific knowledge and the natural world during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. She is currently completing her monograph, Imagining Free Energy: Fantasies, Utopias, and Critiques of America, which introduces the concept of "free" or unlimited energy as a critical framework for understanding the conditions of human society since the early nineteenth century.
www.lynnbadia.com

Selected Publications:

“Émile Durkheim’s Theory of Culture as Force and Energy,” Cultural Studies, in press.

“Surveillance,” in Fueling Culture: Energy, History, Politics, Ed. Imre Szeman, Jennifer Wenzel, and Patricia Yaeger. Fordham University Press (Forthcoming 2016).

“‘A Transcendentalism in Mechanics’: Henry David Thoreau’s Critique of a Free Energy Utopia.” Nineteenth-Century Contexts, Special Issue: “Nineteenth-Century Energies” Dec 2014, 36:5, p. 405-419.

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CHARLES BARBOUR is Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at Western Sydney University, Sydney, Australia. He works in the area of social and political theory, with a particular emphasis on the early writings of Karl Marx.

Selected Publications:

The Marx-Machine: Politics, Polemics, Ideology, Lexington Press, 2012

After Sovereignty: On the Question of Political Beginnings, Routledge, 2010

'Between Politics and Law: Hannah Arendt and the Right to Have Rights' in Hannah Arendt and the Law, Bloomsbury, 2013

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RON BROGLIO is an associate professor in the Department of English at Arizona State University and Senior Scholar at the university’s Global Institute of Sustainability. His research focuses on how philosophy and aesthetics can help us rethink the relationship between humans and the environment.

Selected Publications:

Beasts of Burden: Biopolitics, Labor and Animal Life in British Romanticism (forthcoming SUNY 2016).

Surface Encounters: thinking with animals and art (published with Minnesota Press’s Posthumanities Series, 2011)

Technologies of the Picturesque (Bucknell, 2008)

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SILVIA CERNEA CLARK is a PhD candidate in Comparative Literature at Brown University. Her research interests include 20th- and 21st-century literature and criticism/theory; narrative theory; media theory; the contemporary novel; technologies and ecologies of embodiment. Her current project investigates how narrative perspective in the contemporary novel articulates the relationship between self and world in the context of climate change and globalization. While at Brown, Silvia was a graduate fellow at the Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women and an Assistant Editor for NOVEL: A Forum on Fiction.

TED GEIER is Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the 2015-16 Rice Seminars, "After Biopolitics." He completed his dissertation in Comparative Literature and Critical Theory at UC Davis as a Provost's Dissertation Fellow. At Davis, he founded a multi-campus Interdisciplinary Animal Studies research group (nonhumans.org) and was an active member of other collaborative research groups such as the UC Davis Environments & Societies Mellon Initiative. His teaching and research interests are primarily in aesthetic form & ecological thought in literature and film (esp. British literature of the long 19th c., Malick, Calvino, and Kafka). He has two current book projects, Under Arrest: Kafka's Nonhuman Form and Meat Markets: Victorian Butchery from Dracula to Bovril, and is developing work on Terrence Malick's Ecocinema.

Selected Publications:

"Real Life: Italo Calvino's funghi ecology." PAN: Philosophy Activism Nature, vol. 10 (2013), p. 67-76

"Noncommittal Commitment: Alien Spaces of Ecocosmopolitics in Recent World Literature," forthcoming in Ecocriticism and Geocriticism, eds. Robert Tally & Christine Battista. Palgrave Macmillan 2016.

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AARON JAFFE is Frances Cushing Ervin Professor of American Literature at Florida State University. He works on modern and contemporary literature and culture, with a special interest in cultural and aesthetic theory.

Selected Publications:

The Way Things Go: An Essay on the Matter of Second Modernism (University of Minnesota Press, 2014).

The Year's Work at the Zombie Research Center, co-editor with Edward Comentale (Indiana University Press, 2014).

"Total Unconscious: Jameson, Conrad and James," Henry James Review, 36.3 (Fall 2015).

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DOMINIC PETTMAN is Chair of Liberal Studies, New School for Social Research, and Professor of Culture & Media, Eugene Lang College.

Selected Publications:

Love and Other Technologies: Retrofitting Eros for the Information Age (Fordham, 2006)

Human Error: Species-Being and Media Machines (Minnesota, 2011)

Look at the Bunny: Totem, Taboo, Technology (Zero Books, 2013)

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New Members 2016

JASON BARKER is Associate Professor of English at Kyung Hee University, Republic of Korea, and Visiting Professor of Media Philosophy at the European Graduate School, Switzerland. He is author of the first monograph on Alain Badiou; the writer-director and co-producer of the Arte/ZDF documentary Marx Reloaded; and author of the forthcoming novel Marx Returns (2018, John Hunt Publishing). He is the editor, with G. M. Goshgarian, of a special issue of diacritics (43.2) dedicated to the philosophy of Louis Althusser and editor of ‘Louis Althusser: Marginal Thinking,’ an online forum at the Los Angeles Review of Books.

IAN BUCHANAN has published on a wide variety of subjects across a range of disciplines, including literary studies, cultural studies, communications studies and philosophy. He has published on film, literature, music, space, the internet and war as well a number of other subjects.  He is the author of the Oxford Dictionary of Critical Theory and the founding editor of the international journal Deleuze Studies.  He is also the editor of four book series: Deleuze Connections (EUP), Critical Connections, Plateaus (EUP) and Deleuze Encounters (Continuum).

MARK G. E. KELLY is Associate Professor and ARC Future Fellow in the School of Humanities and Communication Arts at Western Sydney University. He is the author of three books on the thought of Michel Foucault, as well as Biopolitical Imperialism (Zero, 2015) and For Foucault: Against Normative Political Theory (SUNY, forthcoming).

JOHN PROTEVI is Phyllis M Taylor Professor of French Studies and Professor of Philosophy at Louisiana State University (USA).

Selected Publications:

Life, War, Earth: Deleuze and the Sciences (2013), University of Minnesota Press

Political Affect: Connecting the Social and the Somatic (2009), University of Minnesota Press

He is also editor of A Dictionary of Continental Philosophy (Edinburgh and Yale, 2005).

He maintains an active website for research and teaching (www.protevi.com/john/) and an occasional blog (proteviblog.typepad.com/protevi/)

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IRIS VAN DER TUIN is associate professor in, and program director of, Liberal Arts and Sciences at Utrecht University. She is also director of the School of Liberal Arts and chair of the COST Action New Materialism: Networking European Scholarship on ‘How Matter comes to Matter’ (2014-18).

JESSICA WHYTE is Senior Lecturer in Cultural and Social Analysis at the University of Western Sydney, Australia and an Australian Research Council DECRA Fellow. Her research interests include theories of sovereignty and biopolitics, critiques of human rights and contemporary European philosophy, particularly Agamben and Foucault. Her work has been published in a range of fora including Law and Critique; Humanity: An International Journal of Human Rights, Humanitarianism and Development; Theory and Event; and Contemporary Political Theory. Her first monograph, Catastrophe and Redemption: The Political Thought of Giorgio Agamben, was published by SUNY in 2013. Her forthcoming book, Governing Homo Economicus: Human Rights and the Rise of Neoliberalism will be published by Verso in 2017. She is also working on the three-year Australian Research Council-funded project: “Inventing Collateral Damage: The Changing Moral Economy of War.” This project aims to provide a novel philosophical account of the invention of the discourse of ‘collateral damage’.